What to Write in Sympathy Messages

Sympathy Messages for When You Don’t Know What to Write

  1. I can’t think of anything I can say that will make everything better. I do want you to know that I love you and that I am available to talk.
  2. I know that I can’t fix the pain you feel. I want you to know I feel for you, I’m thinking of you, and I’d do anything to help you.
  3. I could not possibly understand what you are feeling. I want to send you my deepest sympathy. I’m willing to listen.
  4. I know that even though you have a loss, you still have some great memories. I hope those memories will bring give you comfort.
  5. I struggle for the right words to give you support. Please accept my condolences.
  6. There’s nothing I can say to help you in your time of sorrow. I know that you’ll always carry ___________ in your heart.
  7. I wish I could express to you all the appropriate words. All I can say is that I am sorry for your loss and that I want you to know that you mean a great deal to me.
  8. Please accept my condolences to you during this difficult time. I want you to know that you’re in my prayers.
  9. I know there’s nothing I can say or do to fix things.  Please know that you are in my thoughts and prayers.
  10. I wish I could do more than give you my sympathy. Please let me know how I can help. Know that I am here if you need anything, and I love you.

Suggestions for Sympathy Card Messages

  1. Don’t try to tell the person how he/she feels. For example, “I know you probably feel awful and mad at the world.”  It’s best to assume that you don’t know how the person feels.
  2. Don’t write anything about your own problems.  If you lost someone once, you can mention something that helped you. Question the purpose of bringing up your own experiences in the sympathy message. Save stories for when you talk to the person.
  3. Don’t ever bring up a debt or something that was borrowed of yours. If someone borrowed something or owes you money, be decent enough to wait a few weeks before asking for it from the family. Unless, of course, you think they are going to sell it or claim it as their own. Even then, consider thinking of the money or borrowed item as a sympathy gift.
  4. Don’t include judgments from God such as, “It was his time to go, it’s all for the best, or he lived a good life and he’s in heaven.” You won’t know what is going through the surviving person’s mind, and you are not God.
  5. Always stay positive. An untactful sympathy card message that is positive is better than a negative message that is eloquently written.
  6. When in doubt, make your message shorter, not longer. The more you write, the more chance you have to offend someone. Brief is good. Stay to the point.
  7. If you offer to help someone, knowing they will have a difficult time, tell the person how you want to help. This prevents the person from asking you to do something you don’ t actually want to do. Also, the likelihood that the person will actually call you for help is low, so tell when you will call them.

Words of Sympathy

Continue reading “What to Write in Sympathy Messages”

What to Write in a Sympathy Card Message

Sympathy card messages can be the most difficult card messages to write. The blank spot in the card can intimidate as it stares back at you. Both you and the card sit there saying nothing, waiting for the other to start the conversation. Here you will find examples of sympathy messages that you can use for the blank spot in your card.

Knowing someone who is going through loss can be difficult, and figuring out what to say to that person can be the most difficult part. You have options. You can write something encouraging, meaningful, or supportive. Make your message sincere and thoughtful. Use the following examples to help you figure out the best sympathy card message you can write.

Examples of Sympathy Messages

Sympathy card messages for a death of a loved one can be the most difficult to write.

  1. Those we love who pass away live on in us through our memories and our character.
  2. I am sorry about your loss. You will be in my thoughts and prayers.
  3. I don’t know what you’ll need in the coming days, but I’ll be checking in on you.
  4. My deepest sympathies are with you and your family at this time of grieving.
  5. Please accept my deepest condolences. I am praying for strength and comfort for you at this time.
  6. The pain of loss is something that none can escape, but you don’t have to go through it alone. I’m available any time.
  7. It’s difficult to lose someone close. If there is any way I can make things easier for you please let me know. Expect me to call to check on you in the next week.
  8. I am praying for you to get through this time with the peace that comes from the knowledge that God loves you and that He will take care of you.
  9. I am sending you this card to let you know that I am thinking of you. I am sorry for your loss. Continue reading “What to Write in a Sympathy Card Message”